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Monday, 09 April 2018 20:15

Assets = Liabilities + Equity

Assets = Liabilities + Equity

At the end of the company’s reporting period, a snapshot is taken of the company’s financial health. A balance sheet allows owners to get a glimpse into the company’s financial standings. The balance sheet is one of the three primary financial statements that business owners use. It allows owners to get a glimpse into the company’s financial standings and see what the company’s financial position is. It shows what assets are owned, which liabilities are outstanding, and any equity that has been made.

Assets
Assets are the things companies own and are categorized into two categories; current and non-current assets. Current assets are defined as cash and any other asset that will be turning into cash within the company’s operating cycle. Assets are the top part of the balance sheet and will be listed in the order of liquidity. Liquidity meaning that this item can be turning into cash quickly. An example of what order current assets would appear on the balance sheet is; cash, temporary investments, accounts receivable, inventory, supplies, and prepaid expenses.

Non-current assets are not intended to be turned into cash with the company’s operating cycle and are what the company owns. They’re the fixed assets such as office equipment, building property, land, long term investments, stocks and bonds.

Liabilities
Liabilities are financial contracts that require a payment of cash for compensation. Liabilities are also categorized into two categories; current and non-current liabilities. Current (or short term) Liabilities are obligations that are to be paid within 12 months or expected to be paid off within its normal operating cycle. Some examples of current liabilities are accounts payable, wages, and rental payments.

Non-current liabilities, also known as long term liabilities are financial contracts that are not due within 12 months, or within the company’s operating cycle. They’re not expected to be liquidated anytime soon. Long-Term liabilities indicate how much the company is currently in debt vs it’s cash flow. Some examples of long term liabilities are bonds payable, long term leases, and product warranties.

Equity
Equity is what is remaining after you subtract what you own (assets) from what you owe (liabilities) and is called net worth. After all debits and obligations have been paid for any remaining values belong to the business owners, also known as owner’s equity.

Want to learn more?
Accounting can be very challenging. We find that most business owners don’t know where to get started. On Wednesday April 25, 2018 at 11:00 AM EST we will be presenting a webinar called “Tools Your Business Can't Live Without: The Only Accounting Guide You'll Need.” Content that will be covered in the webinar will include going over the principles of accounting. Our webinar will ensure that small business owners will have the tools to understand their finances. Topics that will be covered in this webinar are Introduction to Cash Flow, Income Statements and Balance Sheets.Visit the link below for more details.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR THE WEBINAR TODAY!

Crystal Williams, Web Marketing Assistant, WebSan Solutions Inc.,a 2017 Microsoft Modern Marketing Innovation Award Winner

 

Published in WebSan Blog
Tuesday, 13 August 2013 11:00

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Adam MacIntosh is a Senior Account & Project Manager with WebSan Solutions Inc, a Microsoft Dynamics GP Partner and 2013 Canadian Channel Elite Awards Finalist.  Adam can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 416-499-1235 ext 213.

Published in professional services

As of April 1, 2013, the Government of Prince Edward Island is implementing the Harmonized Sales Tax (HST). The combined HST rate in PEI will be 14%, of which 5% will represent the federal part and 9% the provincial part. Further, the Government of British Columbia will be eliminating the HST and reinstating PST and GST on taxable services provided in British Columbia. As of April 1, 2013, you will be taxed GST at a rate of 5% and PST at a rate of 7%.

To create the ability to track these changes in Dynamics GP, one must utilize Tax Details and
Tax Schedules.  Tax Details identify specific taxes and their rate of taxation.  These are then assigned to & grouped on Tax Schedules for processing transactions in GP.  Tax Schedules can be assigned to Customers, Vendors, Items, etc.

Setting up Tax Details

  • Enter a Tax Detail ID and a Description.
  • It is important to set the Type properly as Tax Details can apply to either Sales (to a Customer) or Purchases (from a Vendor) exclusively.
  • Set a default GL Account to distribute tax transactions to in order to capture values in the general ledger.
  • Set both the Based On & Round values depending on the tax.  For HST & PST, these should be set to Percent of Sale / Purchase & To the Nearest Currency Decimal Digit respectively.
  • Set the Percentage for the Tax Detail.  For HST PEI, this is 14%.  For PST BC, this is 7%.

Tax detail maintenance 1

Setting up Tax Schedules

The Tax Schedule Maintenance window contains two list boxes:

  • The Available Tax Detail IDs list box displays a list of all the tax details entered.
  • The Selected Tax Detail IDs list box displays the details added to this schedule.
  • To add tax details to a tax schedule, highlight a detail in the Available Tax Detail IDs list and click Insert. The detail is inserted in the Selected Tax Detail IDs list and is included in this tax schedule. Continue selecting and inserting details until the complete tax schedule is created.

Tax detail maintenance 2

Assigning Tax Schedules to Customers/Vendors

Once tax schedules have been created and saved, the last step in the process is to assign the tax schedule to a customer or vendor, etc.  If a new tax schedule is to be applied to a customer, navigate to the Sales > Cards > Customer.  Then, select the appropriate customer & enter the appropriate value in the Tax Schedule field.  To assign the tax schedule to a vendor, navigate to Purchasing > Cards > Vendor.

For more information contact us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., WebSan Solutions Inc., a Canadian Certified Microsoft Partner

Published in WebSan Blog

In 2012, the Canadian government announced in their Economic Action Plan that they would phase out the penny due to the cost of producing the penny, relative to their face value. February 4, 2013, was the last day that the penny would be made. One thing to note is that this change does not affect cheques or electronic transactions (e.g. Interac). With this change in effect, it’s estimated that it will save taxpayers $11 million each year.

On Microsoft’s Community Dynamics website, I came across a blog Angela Melhus wrote which is called “Phasing out the Penny in Canada”. For a B2B business, this might not be much of a worry because they would normally deal with cheques and EFT payments. But for some B2C business that have a store and accept cash that might be a problem.

In Angela’s blog, she gives you a step by step process to phase out the penny in your Dynamics GP system. Her instructions are very clear and she provides screenshots of the whole process. By the end of the last step, you should have written off of the penny.

More information about phasing out the penny:

http://www.mint.ca/store/mint/learn/eliminating-the-penny-6900002

Angel Melhus blog post:

https://community.dynamics.com/gp/b/dynamicsgp/archive/2013/02/26/phasing-out-the-penny-in-canada.aspx

Natalie Williams, Marketing Coordinator, WebSan Solutions Inc., a Canadian Certified Microsoft Partner

Published in Dynamics GP

There are several different elements that need to be well thought-out in order to receive a good ERP quote. Enterprise Resource Planning by definition is a system that integrates information across a company using services such as: finance/accounting, manufacturing, sales, customer relationship management (CRM) and more. You want to make sure that you get a quote that’s in your budget, but you don’t want to sacrifice the essentials to stay within your budget either. Make some room in your budget for fluctuation and negotiation to ensure that you get the best quote.

Modules

There are a number of modules that are offered in an ERP system, it’s up to you to choose which ones best fit your company. For example if you are a consulting company maybe you only need CRM, Finance and the Sales module. Save money on modules that you don’t need and get the one’s that you do need. You have the option of getting standard or advanced modules. Advanced modules offer more variety of features but are usually used for larger businesses. There needs to be research done to explore what particular capabilities you need.

Number of Users

The number of user’s plays an important role when determining the price. It is important to have a firm estimate of the amount of user’s that you need. Plan in advance to avoid unanticipated cost and to get a more accurate quote.

Training and Customizations

Training can sometimes be overlooked when budgeting for an ERP solution. Even though training could be included in the ERP quote, keep in mind the degree of training they offer. If you know that your staff is going to need more training than what’s offered, suggest to the vendor that you need more training. If you want a feature that is not available but can be done as a customization then that could increase your budget as well.

Natalie Williams, Marketing Coordinator, WebSan Solutions Inc., a Canadian Certified Microsoft Partner

Published in WebSan Blog